Category Archives: Events

Doctoral students show research at MCE

Students in Cohorts 10 and 11 of the Doctorate in Educational Leadership program were out in force on Saturday, April 21, at the 24th Annual Multicultural Education Conference at Sac State.

An event that attracts future and current teachers from throughout the region, the Multicultural Conference is always a great opportunity for EDD faculty, alumni and future graduates to share their research on topics that have already been or could be used in their dissertations. [See more photos from the event]

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Cuádraz, Flores to discuss transformative power of higher education on the working class Dec. 1

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Visiting scholars Gloria H. Cuádraz and Yolanda Flores come to Sacramento State’s Hinde Auditorium at 4:00pm on Friday, December 1, to discuss the transformative power of higher education on the working class. Their talk is based on their new book, “Claiming Home, Shaping Community: Testimonios de los Valles: Underscoring the importance of access to higher education,” published by University of Arizona Press. They will be joined by chapter contributors Manuel Barajas and Caroline Turner.

To offer testimonio, the authors say, is inherently political, a vehicle that counters the hegemony of the state and illuminates the repression and denial of human rights. The book tells the stories of Mexican-descent people who left rural agricultural valleys to pursue higher education at a University of California campus, seeking to empower others on their journeys to and through higher education.

350x505_CuadrazGloria Holguín Cuádraz is an Associate Professor of Sociology in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies at Arizona State University. She publishes in the areas of Chicana/os and higher education, theory and methods of oral history, Chicano labor history, feminist methods and testimonio. With Dr. Luis Plascencia, she is co-editor of a forthcoming anthology,Mexican Workers in Arizona: The Making of an ‘Elastic Supply of Labor’” (Tucson: University of Arizona Press). She is a member of the Latina Feminist Group, co-authors of “Telling to Live: Latina Feminist Testimonios,” (Duke University Press, 2001). In 2013, she was awarded the Dan Shilling Public Humanities Scholar of the Year Award by the Arizona Humanities Council. From 2014-2017, she was Co-Lead Editor of Chicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social.

Yolanda FloresYolanda Flores is an Associate Professor at the University of Vermont where she teaches U.S. Latino and Latin American Literatures and Cultures with an emphasis on the intersections of race, gender, class, language, sexuality, and citizenship.  “The Drama of Gender:  Feminist Theater by Women of the Americas” is her first book.  In addition to articles published in the fields cited above, Professor Flores has also published on performance studies, cultural politics, and Latino farmworker activism in Vermont.  She is a native of Bakersfield, California.

Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner, Ph.D.Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner is Professor of the Doctorate in Educational Leadership Program at the Sacramento State College of Education, is Past President of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), and is Lincoln Professor Emerita of Higher Education and Ethics at Arizona State University (ASU). Her research interests focus on access and equity in higher education. An award-winning scholar, Turner is the recipient of numerous recognitions including the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Scholars of Color in Education Career Contribution Award, the 2016 University of California, Davis School of Education Distinguished Alumna Award, and the 2016 Yolo County Mexican American Concilio Pilar Andrade Award for community service. Turner received her undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of California, Davis and her Ph.D. from Stanford University.

280x351_barajasManuel Barajas was born in Michoacán, Mexico, and he was raised in Stockton, California from the age of four.  He attended UC Davis for his Bachelor’s degree and obtained his MA and Ph.D. at UC Riverside.  He is a professor of Sociology at Sacramento State, and since 2002 he has been successful teaching, serving on- and off-campus communities, and publishing research in peer-reviewed and popular publication outlets.  He teaches both undergraduate and graduate students the subjects of Chicana/o Sociology, Immigration Studies, and Ethnic & Race Relations.  His research has focused on Indigenous Mexican migration and farm workers.  He is the author of “The Xaripu Community across Borders: Labor Migration, Community, and Family” (with Notre Dame University Press) that received a Distinguished Book Award Honorable Mention from the Latino Section, American Sociological Association.  Manuel greatly enjoys working with students and the community, and believes in producing knowledge/advocacy that makes a difference in improving the lives of all marginalized communities.

E-Week at Sac State spotlights school-community engagement

In a TED-talk style presentation and panel discussion Nov. 14 during Entrepreneurship Week at Sacramento State, Dr. Terrance Green, Associate Professor from University of Texas-Austin, and a panel of community innovators had a lively discussion about the ways school-community partnerships are invigorating students and families.

Dr. Green urged reformers to shift their thinking away from the “achievement gap,” to exploring broader perspectives about ways in which opportunity gaps shape people’s lives. “Thinking about the achievement gap emphasizes symptoms, but thinking about opportunities highlights the causes,” he said, making a passionate appeal to those who would reform education to transform their own thinking about the needs of the children and families in the community, beginning with a profound love for people.

Dr. Green’s talk, “Leading for Equity in School-Community Engagement,” can be seen on the Sacramento State EDD YouTube channel.

A panel of educational entrepreneurs discussed “Closing Opportunity & Equity Gaps via Community-Based Innovation.” The panelists included Katie McCleary, Founding Executive Director of 916 Ink; Nicholas Haystings, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Square Root Academy; and Sisters of Nia Executive Director Synthia Smith & co-founder Malika Hollinside, the winners of the 2017 ReinventEd competition.

#EWeekSacState

Special screening of Beyond Measure for Sacramento educators April 20

The makers of Beyond Measure believe children’s health and success hinges on changing school culture from the ground up – 
ensuring that it’s centered around student wellness at every turn.

That’s why you are invited to a special screening of Beyond Measure from 7-9 pm April 20 at Sierra 2 Theater, 2791 24th Street, Sacramento. We need leaders in every community who can engage diverse stakeholders, assess individual school needs, and create space for localized conversation and action about childhood health and learning.

Since 2009, more than 8000 schools have shown either Race to Nowhere or Beyond Measure to facilitate meaningful conversations about creating healthy learning environments for our children.

The Sacramento screening on April 20 is sponsored by the School Psychology Program and the Doctorate in Educational Leadership in the College of Education at Sacramento State. Tickets are $10 in advance, or $15 at the door. Proceeds of the event go to support doctoral students. Purchase advance tickets at bit.ly/BMSierra2.

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Outstanding dissertations showcased April 7

Honoring the authors of three outstanding dissertations completed as part of the requirements for the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (Ed.D.) degree, the College of Education and the College of Social Sciences & Interdisciplinary Studies will host the Fourth Annual Outstanding Dissertation Showcase Panel from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, April 7, in the Foothill Suite of the University Union. The event showcases the critical research being done by doctoral candidates and graduates, and is open to the public.

The 2016 awardees are: Rachelle Cypher, Ed.D.; Jeffrey Mrizek, Ed.D.; and Joseph Williams, Ed.D. Dissertations were chosen based on the quality of the research design, the written analysis and summary, and the potential of the dissertation results to transform schools or colleges.

RachelleFoxDr. Cypher’s dissertation, “An Analysis of How Teacher Education Programs Prepare Teachers to Meet the Instructional Needs of English Learners,” which found that more is needed than just “good teaching” preparation if teachers are to enter the classroom able to understand how to instruct English learners.

Dr. Rachelle Cypher worked at the Center for Teacher Quality for ten years analyzing survey data regarding teacher preparation at the university level. After completing her dissertation, she wanted to learn more about the K-12 system and accepted a position as Coordinator of Research and Data at Natomas Unified School District. Still in her first year at NUSD, she is excited to continue sharing her dissertation findings with site and district leaders to help close the achievement gap.

JeffreyMrizekIn the research for his dissertation, “Assessing Collective Impact for the Emergence of Competency Based Statewide ‘Public to Public’ Civil Service Career Pathways,” Dr. Mrizek found that a shared meaning of “career readiness” through policy and curriculum alignment is still needed to form competency-based career pathways as a strategy to overcome the growing skills gap due to the rising tide of retiring Baby Boomers.

Dr. Jeffrey Mrizek is a passionate educational leader focused on developing all student’s competency to both teach and learn for social mobility and success in the 21st Century workforce. His unique experiences as a civil service manager, professor, and entrepreneur supports his leadership calling to act as a systems integrator. As Dean of Career Technical Education for the California Community College Chancellor’s Office, where he leads the internal operations, a team of grant monitors, develops educational policy, and ensures prudent fiscal management of the Workforce Economic Development Division’s $900 million budget of State and Federal funds.

Joseph Williams

Joseph Williams, Ed.D., in “California Superintendents: Leading District-Wide Change to Advance Student Success,” examined the leadership training gaps of California Superintendents and recommended policy changes that must be made to better prepare California school leaders to engage the change process and advance student success.

Dr. Joseph Williams is the Founding Principal of Benjamin Holt Middle School in Stockton, CA. As founding principal, his school will continue to experience growth, which includes two sections of students for the next two years. With this growth also comes leading a growing staff and an expanding campus that is still undergoing construction. Joseph is currently working on writing a book review for the Teacher’s College Record at Columbia University and hopes to expand upon his dissertation when things gradual slow down with the number of challenges that accompany leading a new school.

Read more about the outstanding dissertations and RSVP.

Efforts to adopt California Indian Vetted Curriculum gaining support statewide

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Pictured (l-r) are: Juliana Liebke, K-12 History-Social Science Curriculum Specialist, San Diego Unified School District; Rose Borunda, Professor, Sacramento State; Cathleen Chilcote Wallace, storytelling and California Indian education program author, Luiseno/San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians; Maureen Lorimer, Professor, Cal Lutheran; Michelle Lorimer, Lecturer, CSU San Bernardino; Matt Hayes, History-Social Science Coordinator, San Diego County Office of Education.

Progress toward adopting California Indian vetted curriculum for California students is gaining momentum, thanks to the collaborative efforts of California Indian cultural experts across the state.

With the engaged support and collaboration of Sacramento State’s Native American Faculty/Staff Advisory Council, including Professor Brian Baker of Ethnic Studies, David Ortega of Educational Opportunity Program, and Cecilia Chavez of ENIT (Ensuring Native Indian Traditions), Dr. Rose Borunda and Dr. Mimi Coughlin hosted California Indian experts and public school educators on September 26 for the purpose of introducing California Indian vetted curriculum. Opening the event was Thomas Lozano of the Estom Yumeka Maidu Tribe of Enterprise Rancheria followed by the originator of this effort, Gregg Castro, t’rowt’raahl Salinan/ rumsien Ohlone. Other key presenters included Dr. Dale Allender and Dr. Margarita Berta-Avila; Dr. Maureen Lorimer of Cal Lutheran; Dr. Michelle Lorimer of CSU San Bernardino; Richard Johnson, Tribal Council Chairman of Nevada City Rancheria Nisenan Tribe; Dr. Beverly R. Ortiz, Cultural Services Coordinator, East Bay Regional Park District; Chelsea Gaynor, Individuals & Societies teacher, Student Council Advisor, Mitchell Middle; and concluded with a presentation by Connie Reitman-Solas, Executive Director of the Inter-tribal Council of California.

Another Curriculum Summit was held under the umbrella of the statewide California Indian Conference (CIC) at San Diego State on October 21. Dr. Borunda said the keynote speaker Merri Lopez-Keifer, a Gov. Brown appointee, as Commissioner to the Native American Heritage Commission, brought tears to her eyes when she noted that the California Indian Summits denote progress and speak to the resilience of California Indians who continue to make change in today’s world. For the first time, the Summits are being conducted in a groundswell of local support, where California Indians are providing school districts with curriculum and having an exchange with curriculum experts and teachers.

“It’s changing the way people talk about California Indians,” said Dr. Borunda, “infusing California Indian perspectives and curriculum so that all children can benefit from the depth of knowledge and wisdom of California Indians.”

Sacramento State Ed.D. Candidate Susan Olsen was one of the presenters at the San Diego summit, which also included local California Indian experts Michael Connolly Miskwish of the Kumeyaay Nation, Cathleen Chilcote Wallace of the Luiseño/San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians, and author Gary Robinson, who introduced his new historical novel, “Lands of our Ancestors.” Dr. Borunda’s new Research Assistant, Saima Nazir, promoted the San Diego CIC Summit and was successful in getting many educators to the event.

By request, Dr. Borunda and Dr. Coughlin previously presented at the invitation of Adam Jacobs, Student Coordinator of Diversity for Rudolph Steiner College (a Waldorf School). There were over 50 attendees at the April Curriculum Summit representing Waldorf teachers from Arizona, California, and Oregon. “We hope to do more regionalized trainings, given availability of funds, to connect educators with regional California Indian cultural experts,” said Dr. Borunda.

The proposed curriculum framework was prepared by Drs. Borunda and Coughlin from Sacramento State; Gregg Castro, Co-Coordinator of the Curriculum Summit; Michelle Lorimer of California State University, San Bernardino; Crystal Martinez-Alire, Elk Grove USD trustee; and author Beverly Ortiz.

“This collaboration is so important,” said Dr. Coughlin. “K-12 teachers are often eager to teach more accurate and complete information about California Indians but may not know how.  Building teacher capacity through dialogue with Native Elders and content experts is a powerful reform strategy.”

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(l-r): Gregg Castro, t’rowt’raah Salinan/ rumsien Ohlone, Co-Coordinator of Curriculum Summit; Elonda Castro, supporter and wife of Gregg; Beverly Neddeau, sister of  Dr. Browning Neddeau; Cathleen Chilcote Wallace, Luiseno/San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians & presenter; Dr. Browning Neddeau, Assistant Professor at CSU Monterey Bay;  Dr. Rose Borunda, Professor at Sacramento State and Co-Coordinator of Curriculum Summit; Monica White, Patrick White’s daughter; Patrick White, Jefferson Elementary School.

Legislative acts: How will they impact ELLs?

The Sacramento State Doctorate in Educational Leadership Speaker Series kicks off for the 2016-2017 academic year with a discussion of public school funding at 5:30 p.m. Dec. 2 in the University Union Delta Room.

The speaker is Oscar Jiménez-Castellanos, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education Policy and Evaluation in Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. He has published extensively on K-12 education finance, policy, parent engagement and their impact on opportunity, equity and outcomes in ethnically and linguistically diverse low-income communities.

His talk, “Examining K-12 school funding Legislation for English Language Learners in California: From Bilingual Education Act to Local Control Funding Formula,” will provide a historical analysis of school funding legislation for English Language Learners in California.

This historical legislative analysis reveals that initially a strong link existed between funding for English Language Learners through bilingual education and a pervasive underfunding of ELLs. However, bilingual education was severely weakened by the sunsetting of the Chacon-Moscone Bilingual Bicultural Education Act in 1986, followed by Proposition 227 in 1998. At the federal level, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) further weakened support for ELLs.

California, however, has once again begun to promote biliteracy and a new wave of school funding through the federal Every Student Succeeds Act and the Local Control Funding Formula in California.

Dr. Jiménez-Castellanos will discuss these developments and ask: “How might these legislative acts impact ELLs and funding in the future? What are some lessons learned?”

Admission is free and open to the public. Directions to the University Union and a campus map are available at http://www.csus.edu/campusmap/.